All we do is wine, wine, wine!

So, Autumn is pretty much upon us now whether we like it or not. We do hope you have all managed a safe and fun summer holiday wherever it may have been and the sun shone upon you.

Whilst on the subject of the weather, I thought we should update everyone on the current issues the wine industry is facing both home and abroad. we appreciate in the bigger scheme of things it may seem minor, but it will affect us all in some way or another in the coming months ahead.

There have been a few brief articles in the press with regards to low yields in Europe and abroad in general, with a lack of dry goods and rising costs – plus a lack of HGV drivers to actually deliver the wines and the continued delays at customs due to Brexit. Now I am afraid it is all somewhat coming into reality.

We have not had any our of ‘house’ New Zealand Sauvignon blanc to sell for several weeks now. It’s destined to be several more weeks whilst we await the 2021 to land in the UK and then clear customs, so therefore mid-October. Europe is now quoting 40-45% loss of harvest in both 2020 and 2021 vintage (due to Spring frosts) in key wine producing appellations as Sancerre, Macon, and Languedoc-Roussillon and parts of Bordeaux. Thankfully, whilst significant, especially for the small growers (récoltant), if I may use a skiing term, it’s not a total wipe out. So please bear with us if one of your favourite wine from a particular producer has sold out, we are doing our utmost to continue to offer an exciting range of wines from around the world, and it has given us the opportunity to taste new wines from different producers as well as the less traveled (or fashionable) wines, such as southern Rhone white wines for one example.

This reduction in volume I am afraid in turn translates into increased prices, which we as buyers and consumers are starting to see. This is obviously the last thing we all want after the last 18 months the world has had to endure – but in order for these producers to survive a necessary requirement. We continue to taste all the wines we list which enables us to sell with confidence and ensure the value and quality of the wines we offer remain paramount.

So, as an independent wine merchants where we try to offer the extraordinary rather than the ordinary, we will be trying to tempt you to look beyond obvious, and introduce your palates to the delight of new and exciting wines.

So, Autumn is pretty much upon us now whether we like it or not. We do hope you have all managed a safe and fun summer holiday wherever it may have been and the sun shone upon you.

Whilst on the subject of the weather, I thought we should update everyone on the current issues the wine industry is facing both home and abroad. Whilst in the bigger scheme of things it may seem minor, it will affect us all in some way or another in the coming months ahead.

There have been a few brief articles in the press with regards to low yields in Europe and abroad in general, with a lack of dry goods and rising costs – plus a lack of HGV drivers to actually deliver the wines. This does not even allow for the post Brexit nightmare we continue to face. Now I am afraid it is all somewhat coming into reality.

We have not had any our of ‘house’ New Zealand Sauvignon blanc to sell for several weeks now. It’s destined to be several more weeks whilst we await the 2021 to land in the UK and then clear customs, so therefore mid-October. Europe is now quoting 40-45% loss of harvest in both 2020 and 2021 vintage (due to Spring frosts) in key wine producing appellations as Sancerre, Macon, and Languedoc-Roussillon and parts of Bordeaux. Thankfully, whilst significant, especially for the small growers (récoltant), if I may use a skiing term, it’s not a total wipe out. So please bear with us if one of your favourite wine from a particular producer has sold out, we are doing our utmost to continue to offer an exciting range of wines from around the world, and it has given us the opportunity to taste new wines from different producers as well as the less traveled (or fashionable) wines, such as southern Rhone white wines for one example.

This reduction in volume I am afraid in turn translates into increased prices, which we as buyers and consumers are starting to see. This is obviously the last thing we all want after the last 18 months the world has had to endure – but in order for these producers to survive a necessary requirement. We continue to taste all the wines we list which enables us to sell with confidence and ensure the value and quality of the wines we offer remain paramount.

So, as an independent wine merchants where we try to offer the extraordinary rather than the ordinary, we will be trying to tempt you to look beyond obvious, and introduce your palates to the delight of new and exciting wines.